Customizable Dolls Fort Smith AR

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Customizable Dolls. You will find helpful, informative articles about Customizable Dolls, including "Ball-Jointed Dolls for Beginners - Terminology" and "Ball-Jointed Dolls for Beginners - Customization". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Fort Smith, AR that will answer all of your questions about Customizable Dolls.

Toys R US
(479) 484-0002
5609 Rogers Ave
Fort Smith, AR
 
Game Xchange of Fort Smith
(479) 484-1600
8389 Rogers Ave
Fort Smith, AR
 
Hobby Lobby Creative Center
(479) 484-7071
5900 Rogers Ave
Fort Smith, AR
 
Game Traders
(479) 471-7777
109 Sandston E
Van Buren, AR
 
Photo Toyz Company
(479) 965-7721
123 Parks Dr
Charleston, AR
 
Hot Stuff Dream Shop
(479) 484-7353
5111 Rogers Ave
Fort Smith, AR
 
Learning Oasis
(479) 452-6288
4900 Rogers Ave Ste 100i
Fort Smith, AR
 
Hobbytown USA
(479) 649-9229
1415a Highway 71 S
Fort Smith, AR
 
Rainy Day Entertainment
(479) 639-2122
8716 Northshore Dr
Hackett, AR
 
Toy Zone
(479) 452-6288
4900 Rogers Ave
Fort Smith, AR
 

Ball-Jointed Dolls for Beginners - Customization

Written by Alison Rasmussen   
So you’re new to BJDs. Want to know the history behind customization, and what you need to get started? Let me help.
Anya, blushed and sueded, wearing a DollZone wig in pink. So you’re new to BJDs. Want to know the history behind customization, and what you need to get started? Let me help.

A brief history
  • In the late 19th century, German and French doll makers used ball joints in bisque dolls.
  • They showed up in Japanese art dolls in 1930.
  • It wasn’t until 1999 that Volks created Dollfie, geared towards female collectors, in a Garage Kit. The doll came unstrung and blank, for the ultimate customizing experience. Super Dollfie followed in 2000.
More than basic supplies

Assuming you have an assembled doll, and the basic supplies I’ve already recommended:
  • Resin primer and sealer. Think quality. My favorite is Mr. Superclear.  You’ll have to buy this from a dealer, such as the Junky Spot . I’ve tried Testor’s DullCote, and it works well for faces and small areas, and it’s easier to find. But as a less-experienced user, I find it attracts dirt more easily than MSC.
  • Chalk pastels and/or watercolor pencils. These don’t have to be professional, but be sure nothing is oil-based. Square scrapbooking pastels tend to be too flakey.
  • Gloss sealer of your choice. This is necessary for adding a shiny finish to eyes, nails or lips. Liquitex gloss medium is nice, or you can spend $2 on Tamiya from Volks .
  • High quality brushes. ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from DOLLS magazine

Ball-Jointed Dolls for Beginners - Terminology

Written by Alison Rasmussen   
Thinking about entering the ball-jointed world? Don’t hesitate, and don’t be intimidated by the “fragility” of resin. If a klutz like me can collect resin BJDs, so can you!
Peak's Woods Sky, white skin. Wig by Michele Hardy. Thinking about entering the ball-jointed world? Don’t hesitate, and don’t be intimidated by the “fragility” of resin. If a klutz like me can collect resin BJDs, so can you! Whenever you enter a new hobby, it’s good to do some research--and ball-jointed dolls are a little different from fashion or antique dolls. I’ll start this series of posts on the terminology of ball-jointed dolls--and really, these are the bare bones basics from a beginning collector. You can learn from my mistakes!
First, the terms of the trade:
Ball-jointed doll usually refers to any doll that is strung with elastic and “articulated with ball and socket joints,” according to Wikipedia . Many collectors have definite opinions as to what makes a “true” BJD--it must be cast in resin, for example, or it must have articulated elbows and knees. But for my purposes, I’ll use Wiki’s first line definition.
Resin is a polyurethane plastic. It’s very hard, but can be breakable when dropped.
Most BJDs come with interchangeable wigs and acrylic or glass eyes, which allows for easy customization. In addition, dolls are available as “basic” (nude or in basic underwear) or as a “full set,” which includes an outfit, wig and often face-up.
Face-up refers to the ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from DOLLS magazine